BIPOD PHOTOGRAPHY

 


Photographer Jamison Miller attaches
a two-camera mount to the bipod.

Jamison Miller, photographer of the excavations at Poggio Civitate near Murlo, visited our site in July 2001. Here, as at Murlo, Jamison used his own invention, a bipod with swiveling two-camera mount to photograph our trenches PF 5, 6, and 7 in the Podere Funghi. The results of his work are "aerial photographs" of the trenches. His photographs will be posted on this page in the future. At this time, the photos below chronicle the dramatic process of photographing our trenches with the bipod. The cameras are mounted on a bar attached to a ball-and-socket swivel and are balanced so that they hang level. A cord is attached to align the cameras using laser-pointers adjusted to point at the legs of the bipod when it is correctly positioned. Jamison uses a remote activated cable release to shoot photos with both cameras, one loaded with black and white film, the other with color.


Jess Galloway and Robert Vander Poppen
look on as Jamison Miller studies his chart.


Robert Belanger watches Robert Vander Poppen and Jamison Miller measure
to find the points on which to place the bipod legs for shooting this 5m square.


Jamison Miller shows Katy Blanchard how and where to hold one foot of the bipod.


Jamison Miller explaining to Robert Belanger and
Robert Vander Poppen how to raise and lower the bipod.


Jess Galloway and Rachel Julis hold the bi-pod while Jamison Miller
attaches two cameras, one for black and white and one for color.


Preparing to lift the bipod into place over the first 5m square of the trench.


Beginning to lift the bipod.


Jess Galloway uses a hook attached to a pole to help raise the bipod.


Robert Vander Poppen controls placement
of the bipod leg as the raising continues.


Above and below: Robert Belanger pulls the bipod up with a rope counterbalanced by Rachel Julis;
Katy Blanchard and Robert Vander Poppen brace the feet; Jamison Miller and Jess Galloway guide the cameras.

 


Rachel Julis supports the bipod with a rope.


Jamison Miller uses a cord to align the cameras.


The cameras are mounted on a bar attached to a ball-and-socket
swivel, balanced so that they hang level. A cord is attached to align
them using laser-pointers adjusted to point at the legs of the bipod.


Jamison uses the remote cable release to take photos with both cameras.


Sometimes lowering the bipod after shooting is easy and sometimes it's not.
Here Tony Tuck lost his footing and everyone had to run to catch the cameras.


With photography complete, the bipod is removed and disassembled.