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Indiana, and the Wabash, which divides Indiana from Illinois, and Shawneetown, one of the oldest towns on the river, but in a decaying state.  Came to on the Illinois side, near the Cave in Rock.  Went, with a number of passengers, to see the cave.  It opens full to the river, with a beautiful eliptical arch, of about 30 or 40 feet span, and about the same pitch; runs back into the limestone rock, perhaps 100 feet or more; the floor rising regularly by an easy ascent until it meets the roof, which is nearly horizontal from front to rear.  The banks around the mouth have a rugged and wild appearance, imperfectly seen as they were by candle and lamplight.  These remarks are hastily made, without measurement, of course, and may be erroneous.  My head, stomach and bowels still uncomfortable; no appetite.  Ate no supper, and resolved to take physic in the morning.  The steamboat Patrick Henry passed us in the night, and expect to see her no more.  Met today several steamboats coming up the river, amoung them the Rob Roy, which was at Cincinnati when we arrived there.  She has since been to St. Louis and is now on her return.  A great deal of gambling on board -- no less than 6 card tables at one time.  Some playing high.  Most of the passengers gentlemen and men of business; some blacklegs, with hang-dog looks.  Fit only for the gallows.  Made acquaintance with several gentlemen, among them a Capt. Cardoza, of New Orleans (introduced to him in Louisville), whose family is on board.  He introduced me today to a Mr. and Mrs. Satterfield, of Alexandria, La.  She is young and pretty and newly married, and a Mr. -----.
 
 
 


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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas