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which they charged us $1.50; gave the black oarsman 25 cents.  Bill at Parisat's, $10.

NOTE -- Manchester is a new place, of about forty or fifty houses, built on a small prairie flat, touching a bend of the Yazoo.  It is a dirty and uncomfortable place; a place of considerable trade.  Several large stores, a branch of the Planter's Bank.  A great deal of cotton shipped here; very sickly; two Indian mounds here, the first that I ever personally saw; one about twenty or twenty-five high, and about thirty feet across; the other about half the size.  They are built on the flat, about 100 yards from the river, and above overflow.  There are high hills within one-fourth mile from them.  Several that I saw a few miles above Vicksburg were similarly situated.  At this place resides John Head, the son of Emanuel Head, who is doing well as a house joiner.  E. Head, the father, is also here now, and intends coming out to live.  He told me he has made an arrangement by which he will go to planting in connection with a landholder, who puts in as many hands as Head can put in, and the land and one additional hand, against Head's services as overseer, and divide profits equally.

After crossing the Yazoo we entered upon an unbeaten swamp road, marked only by the recent passage of wagon wheels, and an opening large enough for a wagon.  The greater part of the way half leg deep in mud and water; uncertain where we should lodge.  We passed a deserted cabin, almost roofless, and a suggestion was made for the occupation of it for the night.  But went ahead in hopes of better quarters.  At dusk came to an opening and a house.  Informed by a Negro that it was just taken possession of by Mr. White, from South Carolina.  Rode up and asked for quarters; politely received, and every attention and comfort rendered that his situation would admit of.  Arrived and took possession only last Thursday; bought 2,500 acres, 1,800 of which is warranted above overflow; $40,000, $10,000 in hand, $15,000 in 1838, $15,000 in 1839.  Brought 100 Negroes, large and small.  He is from Columbia, S. C. (a nullifier), named Jos. J. B. White; his nephew, who is with him, Augustus B. Faust; overseer, Gairry.  He is an intelligent, well bred gentleman; supplied me with a pair of leggings in lieu of those I left in Clinton, and a box of Lumettes, or matches.  Broached politics; regretted that we were not nullifiers.  Has a portrait of ----- Warren, of South Carolina, painted by his brother, who he says has some celebrity as a painter; also a portrait of his father, and of a child, which, I think he said, was the father of Mr. Faust.  He says that in five years he thinks two-thirds of the Negroes of South Carolina will be moved off to this or some other Southern State.  The average yield of the cotton lands of South Carolina not more than 100 pounds, ginned, to the acre.  His coming will start several other families.  Dr. Lee, on Silver Creek, and Mr. Wm. H. Taylor, same place, are from South


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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas