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manners.  Yet there are among them some intelligent and respectable people, and their character generally is that of a quiet, orderly, cheerful people, fond of dancing and gambling, unthrifty and unambitious.

The horses belonging to the baggage wagon of the volunteers escaped from the stable lot on Monday night, and have not yet been found.  The company was marched off this morning under command of the Second Lieutenant, and left their baggage to go on when the horses shall be found.  The citizens were drawn up in a line to salute them as they departed.  They were treated with liquor, and some gents. drank toasts in the street.  Mr. J. K. Allen's toast gave offense to Mr. Potter, who resented it.  Some sharp words were exchanged, and a fracas was about to ensue, which was prevented by the prompt interference of Col. Rusk, who rebuked and silenced them.  It is manifest that much ill blood exists in this little community.  Potter is regarded as a disorganizer, and his coming among them is greatly deprecated by the intelligent and well disposed.  He is courting popular favor with all his art, and is succeeding to a wonderful degree.  He can only float in troubled water.[35]
 
 


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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas