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and called out to his men, "Come on, boys, the Mexicans are upon us, and we'll give them Hell."  He discharged his gun; so did Joe.  In an instant Travis was shot down.  He fell within the wall, on the sloping ground, and sat up.  The enemy twice applied their scaling ladders to the walls, and were twice beaten back.  But this Joe did not well understand, for when his master fell he ran and ensconced himself in a house, from which he says he fired on them several times, after they got in.  On the third attempt they succeeded in mounting the walls, and then poured over like sheep.  The battle then became a melee.  Every man fought for his own hand, as he best might, with butts of guns, pistols, knives, etc.  As Travis sat wounded on the ground General Mora, who was passing him, made a blow at him with his sword, which Travis struck up, and ran his assailant through the body, and both died on the same spot.  This was poor Travis' last effort.  The handful of Americans retreated to such covers as they had, and continued the battle until only one man was left alive, a little, weakly man named Warner, who asked for quarter.  He was spared by the soldiery, but on being conducted to Santa Anna, he ordered him to be shot, and it was done.  Bowie is said to have fired through the door of his room, from his sick bed.  He was found dead and mutilated where he lay.  Crockett and a few of his friends were found together, with twenty-four of the enemy dead around them.  The Negroes, for there were several Negroes and women in the fort, were spared.  Only one woman was killed, and Joe supposes she was shot accidentally, while attempting to cross the Alamo.  She was found lying between two guns.  The officers came round, after the massacre, and called out to know if there were any Negroes there.  Joe stepped out and said, "yes, here is one."  Immediately two soldiers attempted to kill him, one by discharging his piece at him, the other with a thrust of the bayonet.  Only one buckshot took effect in his side, not dangerously, and the point of the bayonet scratched him on the other.  He was saved by Capt. Baragan.  Besides the Negroes, there were in the fort several Mexican women, among them the wife of a Dr. and her sister, Miss Navarro, who were spared and restored to their father, D. Angel Navarro of Bejar.[28]  Mrs. Dickenson, wife of Lieut. Dickenson, and child, were also spared, and have been sent back into Texas.  After the fight was over, the Mexicans were formed in hollow square, and Santa Anna addressed them in a very animated manner.  They filled the air with loud shouts.  Joe describes him as a slender man, rather tall, dressed very plainly -- somewhat "like a Methodist preacher," to use the Negro's own words.  Joe was taken into Bejar, and detained several days; was shown a grand review of the army after the battle, which he was told, or supposes, was 8,000 strong.  Those acquainted with the ground on which he says they formed think that not more than half that number could form there.  Santa Anna questioned Joe about Texas, and the state of its army.  Asked if there were many soldiers


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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas