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He speaks highly of Urrea and Garay -- latter is Governor of Durango, and commands the southern division of the invading army.  Siezma commands the center, which is that now at San Felipe; the northern division is destined for Nacogdoches, under -----.[50]  Harrison says the report in camp was that that division had proceeded up the Colorado 300 miles, without meeting a white man.  It will strike across the upper country to Nacogdoches.  He says Urrea was very indignant at the massacre of Fannin's troops; said it was done without his orders or knowledge, and that he intended to resign his command and return to his government as soon as the army reached Brazoria.[51]  Speaks highly also of Garay.  He also confirms the report of a revolution or trouble in Mexico, which had caused the return of Santa Anna.

Here also I saw Capt. Holland, who was an officer in Fannin's artillery.  He escaped the massacre by his prowess and courage.  Captain Wallis was his file leader.  Suspecting what was about to happen from his knowledge of the language, he communicated it to Wallis, and proposed that they should make an effort to escape.  Wallis declined, and said, "Let us meet our fate like men."  But Holland watched his opportunity, knocked down one Mexican, jostled, overturned and ran over a second, and seizing the 'scopet of a third, wrested it from him and knocked him down.  And in the confusion and astonishment that ensued, he ran off.  To his surprize and dismay, he soon found there was an outer line of guards, one of whom raised his 'scopet to shoot.  He instantly lowered his piece and fired, and shot off the fellow's skull.  As he passed him he dashed the 'scopet on him and continued his flight without any further interruption.  He suffered much in his attempt to reach the settlements.[52]  Nine of Fannin's men are now known to have escaped.[53]

I this day bought a horse of Geo. B. Wilson for $50, and am now ready to start.


 

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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas