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boots, 50 cents; mending breeches, 25 cents.

Bought of Dempsey Pace two discharges for three months each for $125, on account of Guy Richards and self.  Paid Moody for writing deeds, etc., $2.

Returned to Marion at 9 o'clock.  Mr. ----- Brooks (new partner of Forbes), kindly got out of his bed and gave it to me, he having another at Hall's.  This courtesy increased the prepossession I had already formed for him.  He is from Norfolk; lived with Suter.  A fine young man.

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[Entry on back of diary]

Houston, July 12th, 1838

Memo to enquire in Virginia for the heirs of Thomas R. Miller, late of Gonzales, who was killed in the Alamo with Travis.  He came from Virginia to Texas in the spring of 1830, and never returned from Texas.  He was a carpenter in Virginia and merchant in Texas, and acquired some lands.  After his death in the spring of 1836, his brother, Richard Floyd Miller, came into Texas, during the runaway scrape, and meeting with some Elijah Tate, Wm. W. Arrington and John J. Tinsley, one or other of them had possession of the papers of T. R. Miller, and Tate had two of his Negro men; he took from them the Negroes and account books and papers, and it is said that he took them to Nachitoches, where, in a drunken or mad frolic he burnt all of the papers, and was himself put in the calaboose.  One or more of his brothers, it is said, came to Nachitoches and released him, and took him and the two Negroes off with them.  Nothing has been heard of them or of any of the heirs of T. R. Miller since.  His creditors have laid claims against his estate to the amount of about $6,000, and Jos. D. Clements has been appointed administrator.  He has about four leagues of titled lands.  The court has ordered half a league, one-fourth a league and one-half of a quarter to be sold, to pay his debts.  There are some lands due the estate from the government; unless claimed by the heirs they will be lost, and the titled lands being unrepresented in the country by any heirs, are in danger of escheat.  Mr. Clements is now in Houston, from whom I have these particulars.  He is here on the business of the estate.  He has written to the heirs in Virginia, but does not know their residence; is informed by one ----- Lewis that they live in Nottaway.  Mr. Clements gave bond in $20,000.  Cannot get the lands from government without a power of attorney from heirs.[10]

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Joseph P. Loller was clerk for T. R. Miller, and knew all his concerns.  He left Gonzales in consequence of stabbing a man, in winter of 1835.  Mr. Clements says there is no danger in his returning, if alive.  He can save much of the estate by his knowledge of its accounts; he kept the books.  He is supposed to have


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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas