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in August, 1823, serving until March, 1827, when he began his campaign for governor of Tennessee. He was inaugurated on October 1, 1827, and elected to a second term. His personally and politically disastrous marriage to eighteen-year-old Eliza Allen took place on January 22, 1829, and she separated from the governor on April 9 of that year. The event is shrouded in mystery, but it appears that Houston believed Eliza did not love him and expressed jealousy if not accusations of infidelity. Both of them kept their own counsel for the most part, leading to gossip and speculation ever since. They did not divorce until 1837. Houston resigned the governorship on April 16, 1829, amidst withering scandal, and one week later left Nashville for life among the Cherokee, who had befriended him during youthful times of trouble. He remained with the Indians for the better part of three years, and first came to Texas in December, 1832. Williams, Houston: A Biography, pp. 16, 51, 58-59, 62-69, 71, 109. For the most complete account of the Houston-Allen marriage, see Elizabeth Crook, "Sam Houston and Eliza Allen: The Marriage and the Mystery," pp. 1-36.

11. [p.112]  The list has been corrected for spelling; for the spellings in the Gray diary, see the published list (printed on the accompanying page) which was either the source of Gray's information or vice versa (spellings and other usages are exactly the same on the manuscript list and the printed list). Also, for the readers' information, full names have been provided in brackets in instances where Gray used initials only. The basic sources for these corrections and amplifications are Louis Wiltz Kemp, The Signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence, and Biographical Directory of the Texas Convention and Congresses, 1832-45.

A total of fifty-nine delegates participated in the work of the Convention. Gray's list of sixty-four men did not include two who arrived late. John W. Moore from Harrisburg finished third in the election behind Zavala and Briscoe but was seated on March 7 (because of the absence of the latter delegate) and signed the Declaration of Independence. James B. Woods was a third delegate from Liberty Municipality who arrived in Washington on March 6 and added his signature to the declaration on March 11. Seven men on Gray's list did not attend the Convention: Randall Jones, Encarnación Vásquez, Juan Seguín, Miguel Arciniega, James Kerr, José María Carbajal, and John J. Linn. Jones and Kerr were earlier opponents of independence, and Vásquez actively favored the cause of the Mexican centralists. Carbajal had also been a proponent of defending the 1824 constitution. Linn, the alcalde of Victoria, spent March assisting the eastward flight of people from his district. Arciniega and Juan Seguín had not been elected to the Convention; rather, the voters chose Erasmo Seguín and Gaspar Flores. Webb, Handbook, vol. 2, p. 60; James Kerr to the People, January 4, 1836, Jenkins, Papers, vol. 3, pp. 415-21; Lack, Texas Revolutionary Experience, pp. 76, 163, 267-68, 284 n 10.


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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas