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possible to the original manuscripts.  Readers will notice several forms of inconsistency that crept into Gray's writing -- in the uses of abbreviations, for example.  In terms of spelling and capitalization, the word Negro is consistently given in the upper case because the distinction between upper and lower case cannot always be discerned in the manuscript.  Gray's spelling style has also been maintained as given in the manuscripts (e.g., humour rather than humor), and words have been left the way Gray spelled them even when incorrect.  Proper names have been kept as in the original even where Gray himself changed the spelling in subsequent references (e.g., Zavalla as a spelling gave way to Zavala later in the diary).  Notes have been added to identify people, places, and events, to elaborate on important ideas, to add significant pieces of information, and to correct his occasional errors of fact or dubious concepts.  However, most often the diary was as correct factually as circumstances would allow, and Gray's interpretations were remarkably insightful.
 
 
 


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The Diary of William Fairfax Gray, from Virginia to Texas, 1835-1837
Copyright 1997 William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies
Southern Methodist University, Dallas, Texas